Showing posts with label Amie. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Amie. Show all posts

Sunday, 26 February 2017

Amie Stolen Future (Volume 3) by Lucinda E Clarke

I reviewed the second book in the series a few weeks ago and I have to be honest and say that I enjoyed that one the most out of the three books. This is the last in the series unless the author is adding another one. The end is open. Overall a series worth reading and I give volume 3 'Amie stolen Future' four stars.
Amie Stolen Future (Volume 3) by Lucinda E Clarke

Amie stolen future is the 3rd and final instalment in this exciting adventure series which I enjoyed from the start. This book was a bit slower to start than the two previous instalments as Amie has to come to terms with rebuilding her life in Togodo after the tragic events at the end of book 2. She is unaware of the threat facing her at home as she gets on with things like hiring maids and sourcing household goods.  The newly appointed maid provides one of the best comedy moments, when Amie discovers the maid is ‘creative’ with the use of her spare time. Without giving too much away, events take an unexpected turn and we are back on familiar ground with Amie having to use her wits and ingenuity to survive. I didn’t find the James Bond style plot too plausible, but Lucinda Clarke writes in such an engaging style that I was willing to let a few things slide.  The end is open so I won’t be surprised if there will be another book in this series. (Any plans Ms Clarke?)

Tuesday, 31 January 2017

Amie and The Child of Africa by Lucinda E Clarke

It has been a while since I read the first book in the series, but credit to the writer that I remembered a fair bit of it and didn't have to re-read the ending of Amie an African adventure. I actually liked this book better, even though I was  annoyed with Amie's stupidity and pigheadedness at first. It is a well written adventure and sometimes it is better not to question the characters actions too closely:) I gave it 5 stars for being an exiting read.
It has been a while since I read the first book in this series, but after a few pages I was back in Africa with Amie. This is not a stand-alone book if you have not read the first book in the series you’re going to be a bit lost, but Lucinda puts a couple of reminders in to help us back on track in the Child of Africa. At first I was a bit puzzled as to why Amie wanted to stay in such a dangerous place as Togodo, but it soon became clear that not only had the orphan Angelina taken a hold of Amie’s heart; but Africa itself too. I think Amie is also secretly an adrenalin junkie that thrives on adventure. I shouted a few times at the book in the early stages when Amie took some unnecessary risks and rash decisions, but gradually I was swept up in the adventure she had blundered into. The character of Shalima, brings an unexpected flavour of Birmingham and a few comic moments to the mixture. A powerful reminder that a lot of recent world events (such as the rise of IS) can start right in our back yard. The story is written in a style that keeps the reader engaged and on the edge of their seats. The adventure moves at a fast pace and it is clear from the descriptions an insight that the writer has lived in Africa for a long time. What bothered me a little in the first book was that Togodo and its civil war were fictional, but here Lucinda has cleverly interwoven some very current real world events and I found I was getting a much clearer view of Amie’s environment. The book ended on a cliff hanger and I’m pleased to see part three(Amie, Stolen Future) is already available.

Wednesday, 18 February 2015

Amie

Here is the first of the reviews I'm doing of a series of four independent writers I promised to review. I did enjoy this one and gave it four stars.


Amie, An African Adventure
By Lucinda E Clarke
Working full time I don’t get to read a lot, so the fact that I managed to read it within a week says a lot about this book. It follows the story of Amie a young na├»ve English woman that follows her husband when he gets posted to Africa. Amie initially has her doubts about going and the author hints that at some point things are going to go very wrong, but convinced by her husband and her family Amie accepts her new life and sets out for Africa with her husband. There an experienced expat woman takes Amie under her wing and shows her the dos and don’ts of living as a white woman in Africa. As Amie initially struggles with the completely different mentality of the citizens of Togodo, she comes to enjoy her new live. So much so she longs to go back to Togodo and its capital Apatu during their annual visit back to England. And here is my slight quibble with the book, Togodo is a fictional country. It is obvious the author has a wealth of knowledge about living in Africa. I’m sure many of the things Amie experiences have happened or been told to the author. She certainly weaves all these impressions into a good story. But every time Apatu or Togodo were mentioned I was left disoriented wondering which country and which regime this was based on and where I was geographically as the story felt very real (somewhere in East Africa near the equator was all we were told) especially . However if you do like a riveting adventure story and to get a general insight into how western white workers live and work in Africa, I can certainly recommend this book.